Tooth extraction and wisdom teeth

 

extraction

Extraction is the term used to describe the removal of a tooth. It is called “simple” because the act of removing the tooth does not involve modifying the gum or bone underlying the tooth to be removed. The dentist will evaluate the tooth or teeth to be extracted according to several parameters including:

  • Their position;
  • The space available to reach them (opening of the mouth);
  • The health of the tissues and the presence of infection around the edges;
  • The presence of carious lesions on the teeth to be treated or on adjacent teeth;
  • The presence of restorations on the teeth to be treated or on adjacent teeth;
  • The presence of cracks or fractures on the teeth to be treated or on adjacent teeth;
  • The presence of gum disease (periodontal) around the edges.

The dentist will then determine whether these teeth can be considered as “simple” or “complex” extractions.

Impacted wisdom tooth

Due to their position, wisdom teeth can cause various problems such as infections and cysts.

A tooth that moves to the roots of the adjacent tooth rather than coming out in an upright position will cause pressure, potentially an abscess, as well as damage or even loss of the neighbouring tooth, while remaining buried in the jaw. In this case, we call it an impacted tooth. This situation represents a potential for damage and sneaky pain since nothing appears to the naked eye.

Solution

Following the evaluation by your dentist, he or she may recommend that you keep your wisdom teeth in your mouth if their position is not a problem. However, this recommendation is conditional on regular follow-up and impeccable dental hygiene being maintained. Depending on the potential risk of keeping your wisdom teeth in place, increased monitoring and, in many cases, extraction will be necessary.

Extraction 2
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